The group yielded 101 coyotes this year, with 40 percent of them affected by mange.

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Tim Notch, Ricky Nelson, Justin Nelson and the next generation of coyote hunters along with a couple of the dogs, including Junior and Jesse (center) who chased a coyote 42 miles.

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The group yielded 101 coyotes this year, with 40 percent of them affected by mange.

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Winter passion is a fun pastime: Hunters work to control coyote population

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by Trinity Gruenberg

trinity@inhnews.com

As the snowflakes announced winter’s arrival, some people readied their fish houses, gassed up the snowmobile or dug their skis out. 

The snow and cold didn’t keep some local hunters from loading up their guns and dogs for a hike through fields and forests for their favorite winter pastime of tracking down coyotes. 

For Ricky Nelson of rural Eagle Bend, the hunt started 57 years ago with his brother Ronny and friend Willis Pearson hunting something smaller, sneakier and red. 

Hunting and trapping red fox was common through the early 1980s.

“It was something to do in the winter,” said Ricky.

“The hides were worth a lot of money at the time,” said fellow hunter Tim Notch. “It also kept the predator population down.” . . . .

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