Wild cucumber has taken over this building. The plant is a native annual and due to the rains it has flourished. It will climb anything in its path.

press to zoom

Wild cucumber has taken over this tractor.

press to zoom

This photo shows the spiny cucumber fruit. It is inedible and contains four seeds. Parts of the plant have been used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes and even love potions.

press to zoom

Wild cucumber has taken over this building. The plant is a native annual and due to the rains it has flourished. It will climb anything in its path.

press to zoom
1/4

Climbing anything in its path . . .

SEND US A MESSAGE

by Trinity Gruenberg

trinity@inhnews.com

    Driving down the road lately it is hard to miss seeing masses of vining white flowers taking over trees and ditches...anything and everything! Some may see the beauty in this plant as it seems ornamental, but most consider it a pesky weed that may be difficult to control.

    Wild cucumber has been prolific this year. The plant enjoys moist rich soil in woodlands, landscapes, thickets, ponds and streams.

    “It likes wet soils and since we’ve had so much rain this spring it is more abundant this year. It does not do as well in drought years. This is a native species and can be aggressive, but is not an invasive noxious weed,” said Nancy Uhlenkamp, Todd County Ditch and Ag Inspector. 

    Wild cucumber is native to North America, but its aggressiveness can cause problems.

    The vine tendrils climb anything it touches and will continue to grow up to approximately 25 feet. . . .

Click Here to Continue Reading

LOCATION